Sunday Praise and Worship: Psalm 8

sunday-praise-worship-amp

Today we praise and worship our Lord Jesus with a song that’s been around awhile but will always be pertinent because it is straight out of the Bible. How Majestic is Your Name is based on Psalm 8, which is a messianic psalm emphasizing the humanity of Jesus Christ and His ultimate victory as Man.

As you listen to this praise song, ponder the worshipful words of David exalting the Lord as our majestic and glorious Redeemer!

Psalm 8

The Lord’s Glory and Man’s Dignity. 
A Psalm of David.

O Lord, our Lord,
How majestic is Your name in all the earth,
Who have displayed Your splendor above the heavens!
From the mouth of infants and nursing babes You have established strength
Because of Your adversaries,
To make the enemy and the revengeful cease.

When I consider Your heavens, the work of Your fingers,
The moon and the stars, which You have ordained;
What is man that You take thought of him,
And the son of man that You care for him?
Yet You have made him a little lower than God,
And You crown him with glory and majesty!
You make him to rule over the works of Your hands;
You have put all things under his feet,
All sheep and oxen,
And also the beasts of the field,
The birds of the heavens and the fish of the sea,
Whatever passes through the paths of the seas.

O Lord, our Lord,
How majestic is Your name in all the earth!

 Please excuse any ads that may appear before the video begins
If for whatever reason you cannot view this video, you can read the complete lyrics here.

New American Standard Bible (NASB). Copyright © 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995 by The Lockman Foundation

Are All Our Sins Forgiven?

Shared from GraceThruFaith.

Are All Our Sins Forgiven?

A Bible Study by Jack Kelley

I’ve received a number of questions about a recent series of online articles disputing the idea that Jesus died for all our sins, past, present, and future on the cross. The articles make the claim that the Bible teaches no such thing. So let’s find out. Does the Bible teach that all the sins of our life were forgiven at the cross or doesn’t it?

Colossians 2:13-14 reads as follows, When you were dead in your sins and in the uncircumcision of your sinful nature, God made you alive with Christ. He forgave us all our sins, having canceled the written code, with its regulations, that was against us and that stood opposed to us; he took it away, nailing it to the cross.

The Greek word translated all in this passage is pas. It means each, every, any, all, the whole, all things, everything. This would seem to support the claim that all sins past present and future were forgiven at the cross. It also supports Paul’s statement that at the moment of belief the Holy Spirit was sealed within us as a deposit guaranteeing our inheritance.

And you also were included in Christ when you heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation. Having believed, you were marked in him with a seal, the promised Holy Spirit, who is a deposit guaranteeing our inheritance until the redemption of those who are God’s possession—to the praise of his glory (Ephes. 1:13-14).

Taken literally, this means the Holy spirit is the down payment that guarantees the redemption of the acquired possession (us). This guarantee went into effect when we first believed. (By the way, for those of you who only speak King James-ese, all translation interpretations on this site are from the Greek text that brought forth the King James Version.)

Read the rest here.

When I’m struggling with depression . . .

ps119-28-amp

Beloved, are your energy and spirit dragging? It happens to all of us at times, making it difficult to think clearly or feel any interest in daily life. Here’s a devotional I wrote awhile back that was published in an anthology titled Anytime Prayers for Everyday PeopleI hope and pray it speaks to your heart.

This particular devotional was in the section titled “Prayers of Supplication.” 

When I’m struggling with depression . . .

Come quickly, LORD, and answer me, for my depression deepens.
Don’t turn away from me, or I will die.
Let me hear of your unfailing love to me in the morning,
for I am trusting you.
Show me where to walk, for I have come to you in prayer.
—Psalm 143:7-8 NLT
…..

My soul melts from heaviness;
strengthen me according to Your word.
—Psalm 119:28 NKJV
…..

God, Who comforts and encourages and refreshes and cheers
the depressed and the sinking,
comforted and encouraged and refreshed and cheered us.
—2 Corinthians 7:6 AMP
…..

When doubts filled my mind,
your comfort gave me renewed hope and cheer.
 
—Psalm 94:19 NLT

…..

. . . I will pray.

Father God,

There is so much in my life today that makes me want to give up. I have no energy to do even the basic things such as getting dressed or taking a shower. Nothing seems right. I despise my job. Food no longer appeals to me. My family and friends want to help me, but the thought of being with anyone is so exhausting.

I just want to be left alone. Why must I feel this way? How could I wake up one day with such despair in my heart? It’s not that I haven’t struggled to shake off this gloomy cloud. I truly have, but nothing has helped. And then I remember how You died on that cross for me and how alone and abandoned You must have felt.

Thank You for showering me with Your life-giving comfort and the reassurance of knowing that You truly understand my suffering. Lord, I turn to You now in hope and faith because even if everyone else in my life gives up on me, I know You’ll hold tight to me with a love that won’t let go.

Thank You for always being my Anchor.

Amen.

When you come to the bottom, you find God. —Nevill Talbot


[From Anytime Prayers for Everyday People. Copyright © 2006 Bordon-Winters LLC]

Moonbeams

1cor-15-41-amp

Moonbeams

By Patricia Knight

“The sun has one kind of splendor, the moon another
and the stars another” (1 Corinthians 15:41).

The surprising advantage of living near a body of water is that whatever action occurs in the sky above—rainbows, storm clouds, or sunsets—often reflect into the mirror calm waters below. Because the two images can be so identical, one might wonder which scene is authentic and which one is an exact likeness.

There are occasions when we perceive we are witnessing the hand of God dipping His brush in His palette of heavenly colors to paint a panoramic view right before our eyes. A tranquil sky with dancing, white, fluffy clouds pierced by a flock of migrating geese; slices of arrow-shaped lightning bolts dividing black thunderheads; a double rainbow that weaves its arc among tall trees; all delight us with reciprocal images in the water. As if God’s beauty isn’t spectacular enough in the sky alone, our Creator pleasures us with simultaneous views in the water.  He alone creates shadows and reflections using variations of light which He spoke into existence at creation when the earth was originally shrouded in darkness (Genesis 1:3).

God made two great lights—the greater light to govern the day and the lesser light to govern the night. He also made the stars. God set them in the expanse of the sky to give light on the earth, to govern the day and the night, and to separate light from darkness” (Genesis 1:16-18).

In the eerie shadows of a late autumn evening, the full moon birthed a celestial reflection of its radiant yellow image in the waters below. The limpid surface was strangely still, interrupted only by random wave movement, causing the moon’s impression to vacillate, alternately dividing into slithering segments, then re-uniting the quivering moonbeams into a lopsided circle.

Ushering in the duplicate full moon image was a dazzling path of moonlight superimposed on the surface of the water, extending like a bridge from one side of the cove to the other. The yellow beam shimmered as the dainty waves rippled in slow motion. Could the iridescence be moon dust directly filtered through the atmosphere from the lunar planet?

Reconfiguring the moon into a large, desultory ball, with segments oozing and bulging as the water gently rocked and rolled, the lake’s version was impressionistic. The original symmetrical roundness of the lunar orb divided irregularly like an onion sliced in random rings. First light, then deep, dark spaces shattered the yellow circle with narrow slivers and wiggly protrusions.

Slicing through the moonlit path emerged a solitary canoeist, a black silhouetted figure in the twilight. The canoeist and his paddle were resting in the stern as the skiff floated freely in the path of the moonbeam. Perhaps the canoeist was overwhelmed by the extravagance of the moment. Soon the craft and paddler were obscured from view, engulfed by the darkness outside the perimeter of the moonlit path.

As the full moon traveled its established orbit in space, the lake’s somewhat distorted, reflected image advanced closer toward the shoreline. While I pondered the unpredictable advance of the oscillating moon replica, it stealthily disappeared from sight. The moon methodically repositioned over the horizon, concluding the nocturnal, whimsical performance of the moon duet. Devoid of celestial light, sky and lake spontaneously merged, lowering a heavy curtain of darkness on the stage of the current night’s performance.

Oh, how magnificent is our Lord, who splashes His brilliant designs throughout our world! He choreographs the change of seasons and pops flowers from underground to bloom in elegant beauty. He crowns majestic mountaintops with melting snow, renewing streams and ponds below. Expansive canyons are formed when God carves out great chunks of earth. He controls the ocean’s waves by adjusting the rhythmic tug of the moon. How majestic is God’s name and greatly to be praised!

ps19-1-amp

 “The heavens declare the glory of God;
the skies proclaim the work of his hands” (Psalm 19:1).

Sunday Praise and Worship: #Victorious

sunday-praise-worship-amp

Beloved, today let’s sing and shout for JOY and praise to our victorious King Jesus. Let’s also never forget to thank Him for the victory over death that He claimed on our behalf. If He had not been resurrected from death, we would not have that glorious hope of everlasting life with Him in heaven.  

O death, where is your victory? O death, where is your sting?” For sin is the sting that results in death, and the law gives sin its power. But thank God! He gives us victory over sin and death through our Lord Jesus Christ. 
—1 Corinthians 15:55-57

Our ultimate Hope is only in our Savior and Lord Jesus Christ and no one or nothing else. As you listen to the song “Victorious” sung by Third Dayponder the words of David as he praised our victorious Lord:

Psalm 20

For the director of music. A psalm of David.

May the Lord answer you when you are in distress;
    may the name of the God of Jacob protect you.
May he send you help from the sanctuary
    and grant you support from Zion.
May he remember all your sacrifices
    and accept your burnt offerings.
May he give you the desire of your heart
    and make all your plans succeed.
May we shout for JOY over your victory
    and lift up our banners in the name of our God.

May the Lord grant all your requests.

Now this I know:
    The Lord gives victory to his anointed.
He answers him from his heavenly sanctuary
    with the victorious power of his right hand.
Some trust in chariots and some in horses,
    but we trust in the name of the Lord our God.
They are brought to their knees and fall,
    but we rise up and stand firm.
Lord, give victory to the king!
    Answer us when we call!

 Please excuse any ads that may appear before the video begins
If for whatever reason you cannot view this video, you can read the complete lyrics here.

Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV ® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.

Purposes of Christ in Suffering

phil1-21-amp

Purposes of Christ in Suffering

By Dr. Joel R. Beeks

Christ intends to use suffering in the lives of His people to sanctify them and to prepare them for eternal glory.  Recognize how sanctified affliction is used to glorify God.  First of all, sanctified affliction humbles you (Deut. 8:2), teaches you what sin is (Zech. 12:10), and causes you to seek God (Hosea 5:15). Affliction vacuums away the fuel that feeds your pride.

Secondly, sanctified affliction serves to keep you in Christ’s communion, closely by His side, to conform you to Him, making you partakers of His suffering and image, righteousness and holiness (Heb. 12:10-11).

Thirdly, sanctified affliction serves to wean you from the world and to cause you to work by faith.  Perhaps affliction bites you so deeply because you are too little at home with the Word and ways of God and too much at home with the world.  In prosperity you often talk of living by other-worldly faith, but in adversity you live your talk.  Discover the truth of Robert Leighton’s words, ‘Affliction is the diamond dust that heaven polishes its jewels with.’

Recognize also that the end of all of His affliction, and ours, is eternal glory.  Think more of your coming crown and your eternal communion with God’s Triune saints and angles. ‘He that rides to be crowned, ‘John Trapp wrote, ‘will not think much of a rainy day.’

Consider Christ: His afflictions, power, presence, perseverance, prayers, goals, and end. Seek grace to live Christianly today through and in your afflictions and you shall soon discover with the apostle, ‘For me to live is Christ and to die is gain’ (Phil. 1:21).

#Faith the Size of a Mustard Seed

Holding a small mustard seed in the palm of a hand.

As long as we have unsolved problems,
unfilled desires, and a mustard seed of faith,
we have all we need for a vibrant prayer life. 

—John Ortberg

Mustard seed faith is sometimes a difficult concept but one that is very important to understand. The mustard seed is one of the smallest seeds found in the Middle East, but that smallest of seeds grows into one of the largest plants. Jesus therefore used this illustration several times to show us that even the tiniest grain of true faith can do very great things.

14 When they came to the crowd, a man came up to Jesus,
falling on his knees before Him and saying,

15 
“Lord, have mercy on my son, for he is a lunatic and is very ill;
for he often falls into the fire and often into the water.

16 
I brought him to Your disciples, and they could not cure him.”

17 
And Jesus answered and said, “You unbelieving and perverted generation,
how long shall I be with you? How long shall I put up with you?
Bring him here to Me.”

18 
And Jesus rebuked him, and the demon came out of him,
and the boy was cured at once.

19 
Then the disciples came to Jesus privately and said,
“Why could we not drive it out?”

20 
And He said to them,
“Because of the littleness of your faith;
for truly I say to you, if you have faith the size of a mustard seed,
you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move;
and nothing will be impossible to you.

—Matthew 17:14-20

We see here the central need of faith, without which nothing can happen. When Jesus spoke about removing mountains he was using a phrase which the Jews knew well. A great teacher, who could really expound and interpret scripture and who could explain and resolve difficulties, was regularly known as an uprooter, or even a pulverizer, of mountains. To tear up, to uproot, to pulverize mountains were all regular phrases for removing difficulties. Jesus never meant this to be taken physically and literally. After all, the ordinary man seldom finds any necessity to remove a physical mountain. What he meant was: “If you have faith enough, all difficulties can be solved, and even the hardest task can be accomplished.” Faith in God is the instrument which enables men to remove the hills of difficulty which block their path. —William Barclay

Beloved, having and holding onto true faith is difficult in hard circumstances, but it is possible. In our own physical strength we cannot move mountains. We can’t make something from nothing. We cannot by ourselves change someone’s heart and mind about something. These are under God’s care and control.

What it does mean is that if we rely on the fact that God knows what is best for us, we can rest on the assurance that His ways and means are perfect. And if we believe—have true faith—in that fact, we will be able to pray with a faith that will steadily grow.

Just like that tiny mustard seed.

We will then understand that what we may regard as unanswered prayers are actually part of God’s grand design to mold us into becoming who He wants us to be—completely and absolutely trusting that His ways are best.