Taunts and #Trust

Taunts and #Trust

By Patricia Knight

When he visited his three oldest brothers at the military battle field, David didn’t anticipate he would gain insight into military tactics, become involved in the conflict, and earn status as a national hero.

Israel was at war with their perpetual enemy, the Philistines. The armies faced each other positioned in battle lines on separate hills between a valley. The Philistine army decided issues of war through one champion, thereby offering economy of warriors. One soldier from each camp typically met in combat in the valley between the opposing armies. Adopted from the ancient Greeks, the Philistine tactic struck rigid terror in the hearts of the Israeli troops. Unprepared, the Israelis were caught at a definite disadvantage; they had no physical giants in their fighting force and fewer men with a colossal amount of courage. Thus, a stand-off ensued.

Goliath, the Philistine giant, stood nine feet, nine inches tall. He was protected by layers of impenetrable iron armor everywhere but his face. David heard Goliath bleat his usual chants of defiance to Israel. Twice daily for forty days, Goliath delivered his challenging taunts: “‘Choose a man and have him come down to me. If he is able to fight and kill me, we will become your subjects; but if I overcome him and kill him, you become our subjects and serve us. This day I defy the ranks of Israel. Give me a man and let us fight each other’” (1 Samuel 17:8b-9).

Forty days is a long period to contemplate a formidable foe without taking action, plenty of time for the Israeli soldiers to acquire an overload of accumulated pessimism. The troops were demoralized and terrorized. Fear devastated their faith and their trust in God. Oddly, neither King Saul nor a priest reminded the men of God’s rich covenant promise. They were searching for security and relief from a human encounter. God’s important promise of sovereign support was scorned by the Israeli soldiers, who believed that Goliath, rather than their own God, was invincible.

Their paralyzing fear demonstrated that God’s people had lost all recall of the covenant promises God had made to destroy their enemies in the Promised Land. Victory was a conditional promise, contingent on the people trusting and obeying God. “‘When you go to war against your enemies and see horses and chariots and an army greater than yours, do not be afraid of them. Do not be fainthearted or afraid; do not be terrified or give way to panic before them. For the Lord your God is the one who goes with you to fight for you against your enemies to give you victory’” (Deuteronomy 20:1; 3b-4).

David, at age sixteen, had recently been anointed the next King of Israel, the shepherd of God’s people, and he was planning to defend the threatened and frightened flock. Although there were financial rewards and other perks for the victor who killed the Philistine giant, David was grieved that God’s honor had been violated by Goliath’s accusations. “‘The Lord who delivered me {David} from the paw of the lion and the paw of the bear will deliver me from the hand of this Philistine because he has defiled the armies of the living God’” (1 Samuel 17:36b-37).

When David heard Goliath’s threats, he volunteered to fight the giant. Immediately scoffers dismissed him. King Saul personally attempted to discourage David. “’You are only a boy and he {Goliath} has been a fighting man from his youth’” (1 Samuel 17:33). Goliath sneered in contempt and cursed David, calling him a dog.

David didn’t quickly fabricate courage at such a critical moment. He lived a life of constant obedience, depending on God’s provisions and faithfulness. When an emergency situation arose, David recognized his source of power, assured he could lean heavily on God. By slaying Goliath, David exhibited heroic faith, empowered exclusively by God’s sovereign strength and accuracy.

Courage is not the absence of fear, but the commitment to perform in the midst of fear.

Every day we are confronted with intimidating situations. Do we seek God’s guidance in prayer as our first response? His promises to us are just as valid as they were to the Israelite nation centuries ago: “‘Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be terrified; do not be discouraged, for the Lord, your God, will be with you wherever you go’” (Joshua 1:9). God is bigger and more powerful than any of our foes, no matter how insurmountable they may appear.

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Like us, David wasn’t fearless. Fear is a normal human reaction to threats or danger. God desires to relieve us of the emotional stress created by the myriad fearful situations that occur daily: fear of criticism, panic of public speaking, dread of death; even our personal insecurities are masked fears. King David wrote, “Praise be to the Lord, to God our Savior, who daily bears our burden” (Psalm 68:19).

Do our lives demonstrate a consistent faith that exhibits obedience and worship? Asking God to intervene is often a last resort. That need not be, according to the assurances in God’s Word. “‘Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you.’  So I say with confidence, ‘the Lord is my helper. I will not be afraid. What can man do to me?’” (Hebrews 13:5-6).

The next time your heart begins to freeze with fear, whisper a quick prayer to Jesus. In a time-sensitive situation, simply cry out, “Help!” When we experience shock, words often elude us, but we are assured that God knows our predicament and He has made provisions for it. As believers, our spirit is joined with the Spirit of God. During those times when fear renders us spiritually mute, “the Holy Spirit prays for us with groanings that cannot be expressed in words. And the Father who knows all hearts knows what the Spirit is saying, for the Spirit pleads for us believers in harmony with God’s own will” (Romans 8:26b-27, NLT).

As Christians, we are permitted ready access to Almighty God. Let us not diminish the love and grace buttressing that gift. “‘I am the Lord, the God of all mankind. Is anything too hard for me?’” (Jeremiah 32:27). God is worthy of our obedience; He is always faithful, fulfilling every promise in exact detail. Jesus came to earth with the promise of peace as the Messiah. In His war against sin and injustice, Jesus is the ultimate victor (Colossians 1:20).

How many giants do we face who threaten to reduce us to a quivering mass of fear? God’s directions remain the same as centuries ago. “Do not be discouraged, for the battle is not yours, but God’s. Stand firm and see the deliverance the Lord will give” (2 Chronicles 20:15).

Our Lord will slay giants so enormous we cannot see beyond them,
for God is our ultimate source of confidence, power, and victory.

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Sunday Praise and Worship: More and More

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Happy Sunday, Beloved!

I have to confess that these Sunday Praise and Worship posts are my favorite ones to put together. Why? Because I get to spend so much time listening to some wonderful praise and worship songs, which lead me to search Scripture for passages that go well with those songs.

I cannot sing along with lyrics like these without feeling the overflowing love of God, the undeniable mercy and grace of my Savior Jesus. and the fire of the Holy Spirit that guides me through my days.

Now as the people were in expectation,
and all reasoned in their hearts about John,
whether he was the Christ or not,
John answered, saying to all,
“I indeed baptize you with water;
but One mightier than I is coming,
whose sandal strap I am not worthy to loose.
He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire.
His winnowing fan is in His hand,
and He will thoroughly clean out His threshing floor,
and gather the wheat into His barn;
but the chaff He will burn with unquenchable fire.”
—Luke 3:15-16

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The words of “More and More” by Selah should echo our hearts’ desire. May we always yearn for more and more of God in our lives.

 

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If for whatever reason you cannot view this video, you can read the complete lyrics here.

Holy Spirit, You are welcome here

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I hope you enjoyed last Sunday’s Holy, Holy, Holy Praise and Worship post. I’m excited to see what God has planned for these Sunday posts!

Our lives are so filled with activity and work that even though we attend church on Sunday (those of us who can), do we allow ourselves to relax and rest in our corporate praise and worship? Or do thoughts of all the to-do’s on our lists keep us from fully worshiping and praising our Creator?

I’ve been listening to this song so much that it is always playing in my mind lately. Whether you are able to worship with your church congregation or are in the privacy of your home, allow the Holy Spirit to saturate your heart and mind while viewing this video.

Holy Spirit
(Chorus)

Holy Spirit, You are welcome here
Come flood this place and fill the atmosphere
Your glory,God, is what our hearts long for
To be overcome by Your presence, Lord

The video below is a version of “Holy Spirit” sung by  Francesca Battistelli with lyrics:

If for any reason you cannot view the video, go here to read the lyrics, written by Bryan & Katie Torwalt.

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Living a Life of being Filled with and Walking in the Spirit

Beloved, as a follower of and believer in Jesus Christ, are you living a life filled with the Holy Spirit? And are you walking in the Spirit? This is an excellent explanation of what it means to be filled with and walk in the Spirit by my bloggy friend, Raymond Candy. Please spend some time perusing other wonderful posts on his blog, As Seen Through the Eyes of Faith.

Living a Life of being Filled with and Walking in the Spirit

“And be not drunk with wine, wherein is excess; but be filled with the Spirit;”  (Eph. 5:18)

“If we live in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit.”  (Gal. 5:25)

Since the beginning of the early Christian Church there have been many different doctrines and beliefs as to what it means to “walk in the Spirit”.

The same holds true today.

Satan does not want you to discover how to walk in the Spirit.

At the very most he would like to see you fall in your Christian walk, give up, and turn from the faith.

At the very least he would like to see you continuously stumble and falter so that your faith would be weak and ineffectual.

Before we establish our belief as to what it is to “walk in the Spirit”, let us see what it is not.

Read the rest here.

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My Consolation

Wonderful Wednesday

It has been quite a long time since I’ve posted anything new in my Wonderful” series on the Wonderful Names of Our Wonderful Lord, so I think it is time to share another one.

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The Consolation of Israel

There was a man in Jerusalem, whose name was Simeon; and the same man was just and devout, waiting for the consolation of Israel. —Luke 2:25

For when we brought you the Good News, it was not only with words but also with power, for the Holy Spirit gave you full assurance that what we said was true. And you know of our concern for you from the way we lived when we were with you. —1 Thessalonians 1:5

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Simeon was just and devout and waited for the “Consolation of Israel.”  “Consolation” means “paraclete” (One coming alongside) as we think and speak of the Holy Spirit who comes to abide in and lead us out in our daily life. Simeon was waiting for the deliverance of the Jews by the coming of the Messiah. They did not as a nation receive Him, but some did and were consoled, and Israel shall yet have the promised consolation, as Paul was comforted by the power of the indwelling Holy Spirit (1 Thessalonians 1:5). 

Lord, may we also rely upon the abiding comfort of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit all the day. Amen.

[Taken from Wonderful Names of Our Wonderful Lord, by Charles E. Hurlburt and T. C. Horton. Copyright © 2002 by Barbour Publishing, Inc.]

My thoughts

When I said, “My foot is slipping,” Your love, O LORD, supported me. When anxiety was great within me, Your consolation brought joy to my soul. —Psalm 94:18-19 

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Years ago people with whom I worked gave me the nickname Smiley. Someone even found a smiley face poster and placed it in my workspace. I guess I’ve always been an optimist no matter how bad things are. But some have not believed this to be a good
thing, rather that I should be more of a realist.

I say there is plenty of reality surrounding me every day that I don’t like at all. There have been times I’ve been so anxious about  my situation, I’ve lost sight of the most important thing of all: my relationship with God. Whenever I concentrate too much on the reality of things, I focus more on myself and my circumstances and I lose sight of the Lord.

In Psalm 94:18-19, we are assured that our Lord is ever waiting to console our anxiety and to support us in our times of greatest need. I’ve personally found that every time I turn from my pain and frustration to the face of the One who loves me and cares for me so much, my viewpoint completely changes. Instead of the harsh reality of my illnesses, I feel surrounded by a love too great to measure.

It is as if God’s arms are holding me close in a calm, soothing embrace.

I’d much rather be known as Smiley than Grouchy any day. Who knows? My outward smile may reach inside someone else’s hurt and help them see that they are not alone in their pain, that there is One who is ready to console them right there and then.

Prayer: Heavenly Father, some days are more difficult to get through than others. Just when I’m feeling a little better, I’ll have a day that brings me to my knees. But maybe that’s exactly what you want from me, and if so, then by Your grace I will smile as I look to You for my consolation. Amen.

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SmileyBlackCoffeeAnna

WHITE SPACE

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The Lord Bless You

Beloved, on this Thankful Thursday, I hope this Scripture passage encourages and comforts you as much as it does me.

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I love what J. Vernon McGee had to say about it. Here is an excerpt from his Thru the Bible with J. Vernon McGee commentaries:

Here we find the Trinity in the Old Testament. God the Father is the source of all blessing. The Lord Jesus is the One who makes His face to shine upon us. The Holy Spirit lifts up His countenance upon us and gives us peace. This is the only way we can come to God and experience the peace of God. He is the One who makes these things real to our hearts.

The triune God gives them this blessing. The census has been taken, and they all know their pedigree. The standards have been raised; so they all know where they belong. They are to follow their standard, and they are to camp in their assigned place in the camp with their own tribe and their own family. The camp has been cleansed. Now the Lord blesses them. It is the only way God  can bless.

What a wonderful blessing there is here. God the Father keeps us; the Son makes His face to shine upon us—He is the light of the world; God the Holy Spirit gives us peace. What a glorious chapter this is! (1)

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The Lord said to Moses, “Tell Aaron and his sons, ‘This is how you are to bless the Israelites. Say to them:

“‘The Lord bless you and keep you;
the Lord make his face shine on you and be gracious to you;
the Lord turn his face toward you and give you peace.'”

“So they will put my name on the Israelites, and I will bless them.”
—Numbers 6:22-27

AnnaSmile…..

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(1) McGee, J. Vernon. Through the Bible with J. Vernon McGee. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, Inc. 1981.

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