When Routines Become Idols

Reblogged from the Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood (CBMW)

When Routines Become Idols 

By Christina Fox

From the moment we are born, our lives center around our daily routines. We rise with the sun and sleep when it sets. We work during the week and rest on the weekend. Our bellies are quick to tell us when we miss one of our thrice daily meals. We attend school during the fall, winter, and spring, and play all summer. We celebrate the same holidays year after year.

God created routines when he set the sun and moon in space. He organized our week by giving us a day of rest. He even provided the Israelites with yearly festivals, celebrations, and remembrances.

Pediatricians tell us that children thrive and feel safe when they have routines and structure to their day. Routines are good for us as adults as well. They keep us on track and organized. They give shape to our day and keep us from getting distracted. Indeed, routines are good. But routines can sometimes turn from a good thing to a not so good thing: when they become an idol of our heart.

Read the rest here.


When you can’t, He can


When We are Neediest 

When you are the neediest, He is the most sufficient.

When you are completely helpless, He is the most helpful.

When you feel totally dependent, He is absolutely dependable.

When you are the weakest, He is the most able.

When you are the most alone, He is intimately present.

When you feel you are the least, He is the greatest.

When you feel the most useless, He is preparing you.

When it is the darkest, He is the only Light you need.

When you feel the least secure, He is your Rock and Fortress.

When you are the most humble, He is most gracious.

When you can’t, He can.

—Source unknown


Reasons to Be Content

Here’s another great devotional about contentment,
this one from John MacArthur’s daily devotional email series


Reasons to Be Content

“‘For this reason I say to you, do not be worried about your life, as to what you will eat or what you will drink; nor for your body, as to what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing?’” (Matthew 6:25).

Worry is the opposite of contentment, which should be a believer’s normal and consistent state of mind. You should be able to say with Paul, “I have learned to be content in whatever circumstances I am. I know how to get along with humble means, and I also know how to live in prosperity; in any and every circumstance I have learned the secret of being filled and going hungry, both of having abundance and suffering need” (Phil. 4:11–12).

A Christian’s contentment is found only in God—in His ownership, control, and provision of everything we possess and will ever need. Since God owns everything, what we now have and what we will ever have belongs to Him.

Daniel understood the Lord’s control of everything: “Let the name of God be blessed forever and ever, for wisdom and power belong to Him. It is He who changes the times and the epochs; He removes kings and establishes kings; He gives wisdom to wise men and knowledge to men of understanding” (Dan. 2:20–21).

And if we hadn’t heard it from Daniel, we should know it from one of the ancient names of God—Jehovah-Jireh, which means, “the Lord who provides.”

Whatever the Lord gives us belongs to Him. Therefore, it is our responsibility to thank Him for it and to use it wisely and unselfishly for as long as He entrusts us with it.

Ask Yourself

What keeps “enough” from being enough for us? How do we define the level of property or possessions we need in order to feel satisfied with our supply? Why are these measurements so often faulty and skewed away from sound biblical understanding?

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From Daily Readings from the Life of Christ, Vol. 1, John MacArthur. Copyright © 2008. Used by permission of Moody Publishers, Chicago, IL 60610


A Change of Plans



A couple of months ago I decided to try posting more often than I had been doing. What I discovered is that I’ve been putting so much work into these almost-daily posts that I’ve been neglecting my other writing responsibilities. Since I believe that the Lord has provided these writing opportunities for me, I need to use my limited time and energy more wisely.

Starting this week, I’ll be posting three times per week: Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. I’m very thankful for my contributing writers, which alleviates some of the time I dedicate to this blog. I come across many great blog posts from other sources and I’ll continue to share those with you too. God is doing some great things in my writing life this year and I’ll be doing my best to honor what He has given me to do for His glory.

Beloved, thank you all for sticking with me and being a part of my bloggy world! I appreciate each and every one of you!

To humans belong the plans of the heart,
    but from the Lord comes the proper answer of the tongue.

All a person’s ways seem pure to them,
    but motives are weighed by the Lord.

Commit to the Lord whatever you do,
    and he will establish your plans.

—Proverbs 16:1-3


The LORD Goes Before You

Although today’s post is about something that I went through about 18 years ago, the message is still pertinent today.



But you will not leave in haste or go in flight;
for the LORD will go before you,
the God of Israel 
will be your rear guard.
—Isaiah 52:12

Have you ever needed to be in two places at the same time?

The week before I was to serve as a counselor at a special camp for abused and abandoned children, I received a call from my father. My mother’s heart was acting up and she was back in the hospital. This time the doctors needed to perform surgery as soon as possible.There was no time for the camp staff to find a replacement for me, but I really felt the need to be with Mom right then.

I diligently prayed about this for several days, wondering what I should do. Then one morning I read the above passage during my devotions. The words leapt off the page as I read them again and again, especially the admonition
not to leave in haste or go in flight. I realized that even though those words were originally meant for the Israelites, God was using the same verse that day to tell me to calm down and go to camp as scheduled. He would work out the details and take care of Mom and her surgery.

And as usual, He did exactly that . . . and so much more.

While I was at this camp up in the mountains, I phoned Mom in the hospital after her surgery. After a short conversation with her, I gave the two little girls in my charge the opportunity to talk with her too. They did not know Mom, nor did she know them, but they were excited to be able to talk to “Anna’s mom.”

When we ended the call, one of the girls hugged me around the waist. “Your mom wanted me to give you a hug from her.” And then the other precious child motioned for me to bend down closer to her. When I did, she kissed me on the
cheek. “That’s a kiss from your mom.”

As tears filled my eyes, I hugged both girls and quietly thanked God for allowing them to experience a close family moment with me. These girls—and many others like them—had been bounced from one foster home to another. They had no first-hand knowledge of what it means to be part of a family.

As I made the two-hour drive home at the end of the week, I was struck anew at how well God leads us in our decision-making processes, if only we’ll completely trust in Him and His plans for us. He will always show us the right direction to take!


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Rejoice in the Lord

Today’s devotional goes with Part 3 of my Habakkuk series.



Though the fig tree does not bud
and there are no grapes on the vines,
though the olive crop fails and the fields produce no food,
though there are no sheep in the pen and no cattle in the stalls,
yet I will rejoice in the LORD,
I will be joyful in God my Savior.  

—Habakkuk 3:17-18

When Rick and I lived in the central valley of California, we lived in the midst of a farm belt that feeds the whole country. We lived near groves of almost every kind of fruit and nut trees. Cotton, strawberry and corn fields bordered farms and housing developments alike. I could therefore relate to the words of these verses as I gazed upon field after field of grape vines.

During the summer months, we could see certain fields of grapes drying in the sun to make raisins. And when we looked out into our backyard, there was our fig tree, several weeks past harvest but still in full leaf.

As I contemplated these verses, I wondered about Habakkuk’s strong faith. Here was a man who questioned his LORD’s motives and supposed inaction, yet he also learned to trust and rejoice in Him, no matter what. His joyful attitude makes his words sing.

What about me? Can I still “be joyful in God my Savior” in spite of how I feel each day?

I have spent many years learning to live with chronic illness. In addition to several illnesses, my immune system doesn’t work that well after years of taking too many antibiotics. I seem to fall prey to all the little bugs that are going around, and it takes me more time than most people to recover. I have little energy to complete the smallest tasks in my home; even sweeping the floor seems a monumental project. But in spite of all this, I can still trust that God is taking care of me, that He is still in control, and that I can actually rejoice in that fact.

This season of my life in which I’m struggling with different illnesses is a time when I can complain about the injustice of it, or I can instead be joyful and thankful for God’s presence in my life, no matter what. I choose to be joyful because God promises to be with us in every situation, good or bad.

Rejoice in the LORD always. I will say it again: Rejoice!
—Philippians 4:4

Heavenly Father: Thank you for the joy You provide in every situation. Help me to be Your light, joy and promise of hope for others, even during times of pain and frustration. Amen.



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Grounded in Reason . . . The Four Factors of Faith [GraceThruFaith.com repost]

Photo credit: GraceThruFaith.com

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

A Bible Study by Jack Kelley

If you have faith as small as a mustard seed, you can say to this mulberry tree,
‘Be uprooted and planted in the sea,’ and it will obey you.

—Luke 17:6

Abraham had waited 20 years for the son God had promised him. He and Sarah even had a son with the help of a surrogate mother, but the Lord had told him Ishmael was not the son He had promised.  Finally Isaac was born, the one through whom God would bless all mankind (Genesis 21:12).  But some years later, before any of these blessings came to pass, God directed Abraham to sacrifice Isaac as a burnt offering. Though heart broken, Abraham took Isaac to the place the Lord had picked out, built an altar there and placed his son upon it (Genesis 22:1-10).

Read the rest here.




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