The Saga of the 4 Chaplains

74 years ago today, four Army chaplains committed an amazing act of faith, courage and bravery that has never been forgotten.

Although the Distinguished Service Cross and Purple Heart were later awarded posthumously Congress wished to confer the Medal of Honor but was blocked by the stringent requirements which required heroism performed under fire. So a posthumous Special Medal for Heroism, The Four Chaplains’ Medal, was authorized by Congress and awarded by the President on January 18, 1961.

It was never given before and will never be given again. 

This story is definitely worth reading!

On Feb. 3, at 12:55 a.m., a periscope broke the chilly Atlantic waters. Through the cross hairs, an officer aboard the German submarine U-223 spotted the Dorchester.

The U-223 approached the convoy on the surface, and after identifying and targeting the ship, he gave orders to fire the torpedoes, a fan of three were fired. The one that hit was decisive–and deadly–striking the starboard side, amid ship, far below the water line.

Captain Danielsen, alerted that the Dorchester was taking water rapidly and sinking, gave the order to abandon ship. In less than 20 minutes, the Dorchester would slip beneath the Atlantic’s icy waters.

Tragically, the hit had knocked out power and radio contact with the three escort ships. The CGC Comanche, however, saw the flash of the explosion. It responded and then rescued 97 survivors. The CGC Escanaba circled the Dorchester, rescuing an additional 132 survivors. The third cutter, CGC Tampa, continued on, escorting the remaining two ships.

Read the entire story here.

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Fearful Hands

Is3-7-8-Hands-Limp--AMP

All hands will go limp; every man’s heart will melt.
Terror will seize them, pain and anguish will grip them.
—Isaiah 3:7-8

Fearful Hands

By Patricia Knight

“Hands hang limp,” a description used four times in the Old Testament, is a metaphor expressing fear or failing courage. Isaiah 3:7-8 records, “All hands will go limp; every man’s heart will melt. Terror will seize them, pain and anguish will grip them.” A typical reaction to intense fear is a limp, incapable mind and body. We freeze in our most ineffectual state. Doubts assail us; fear paralyzes us.

Jesus had just miraculously fed in excess of 5,000 men with a boy’s lunch of five barley loaves and two fish. After the baskets of extra food were gathered, Jesus commanded His disciples to go ahead of Him and cross the lake by boat while he dismissed the crowd. Then Jesus slipped away into the mountains for solitary prayer.

Imagine that you were one of Jesus’ disciples. By now it was dark. Jesus had left your group, assuring you He would rejoin you in Bethsaida. Each of you were familiar with the demands of navigation on the local waterways. Several of you were fisherman by trade, having spent your lifetime coaxing a living from the sea. Your group of disciples had rowed three and a half miles into the lake in the pitch darkness. There were no lighthouses or emergency flares; just total blackness.

From Jesus’ outlook on the mountain, He could see you, His beloved disciples, struggling at the oars as the wind buffeted your boat. “At the fourth watch of the night {between 3:00 and 6:00 am} he went out to them, walking on the lake” (Mark 6:48).  

Distracted by the wind storm and thinking only of survival, you disciples worked as a team to keep your boat on course. Suddenly, out of the dark, tumultuous night appeared what you interpreted to be a ghost. With terror in your hearts, you cried out in shock. You had learned the superstitions about spirits in the night, causing disasters. Perhaps this was a water spirit which you had heard spoken about in hushed tones by the elders who told of experiences encountered during their lifetime of boating and fishing.

Mark6-50-51-OceanSprayOnRocks-35--AMP

Immediately he spoke to them and said,
“Take courage! It is I.
Don’t be afraid.”

Then he climbed into the boat with them,
and the wind died down.
They were completely amazed.
—Mark 6:50-51

In response to your fear, Jesus immediately “spoke to them and said, ‘Take courage! It is I. Don’t be afraid.’ Then He climbed into the boat with them and the wind died down. They were completely amazed” (Mark 6:50-51). Not one of you had recognized Jesus until He spoke. Little did you realize when Jesus walked on the water toward your boat, He was displaying the majestic presence and authority of His Lordship, ruling over the waves. As His Word testifies of Him, “You rule over the surging sea; when its waves mount up, you still them” (Psalm 89:9).

God commands, “Do not fear…; do not let your hands hang limp” (Zephaniah 3:16).  Though hands hanging limp is an alternative method to explain fear, I wonder if the disciples’ hands dropped their oars during that frightful, majestic night when Jesus appeared to His chosen men by walking on water?

How often do our hands hang limp when what we need is a surge of heavenly courage and power similar to the promise Moses gave Joshua centuries ago.

“’Be strong and courageous… The Lord Himself goes before you and will be with you; He will never leave you nor forsake you.  Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged’” (Deuteronomy 31:7-8).

Deut31-7-8-StrongBarbedWire--AMPOur experiences with fear may not be as visually explicit as witnessing our Master walk on the surface of water before our eyes. Nevertheless, our fears are just as real. Do such tragedies as developing cancer, being victimized with identity theft, or suddenly losing all of  our earthly possessions in a natural disaster, instill fear in our hearts? Do we allow panic and anxiety to wash over us like raging ocean waves, or do we grab the oars and look to the Master of the Seas as our Source of help?  Our head as well as our hands often hang limp with discouragement in an emergency situation. However, God has promised to care for His own, to provide for all our needs, and to give us victory in conflict.

Joseph was shamefully treated by his brothers when they forced him into a cistern and sold him as a slave to passing merchants. He was then sold to the captain of the guard in Egypt where he prospered, but without warning he was falsely accused of a crime and thrown into prison where he remained for several years, seemingly forgotten!

Job, known and admired as a model citizen who loved and served God, was victimized by having his property burned, his animals stolen, his children killed, and his health so compromised, he was humiliated, grieving, and in constant pain.

The Israelites, God’s chosen people, had suffered in servitude to the Egyptians as brick makers for centuries. They felt hopeless and helpless, waiting for God to rescue them from their cruel taskmasters.

Do any of our fears compare to what Bible characters suffered centuries ago? Perhaps our experiences pale in comparison or we could be dealing with much more horrendous hardships. The Israelites, Joseph, and Job all feared for their lives. Their circumstances reversed when God intervened, working out individual life plans, blessing them richly. Their catastrophic life stories are contained in God’s Word so we can learn from their mistakes and their victories. We aren’t so different from those biblical figures who suffered hardship, disease, and injustice. Their ultimate victory was a gift from God who loved them deeply, just as He does us.

God’s promises have remained constant throughout the centuries. “Have no fear of sudden disaster or of the ruin that overtakes the wicked, for the Lord will be your confidence and will keep your foot from being snared” (Proverbs 3:25, 26). God is worthy of our trust. With promises so personal and profound, why not permanently put fear to rest and rely on God’s rich mercy and grace? Don’t let your hands hang limp, but trust your Lord enough to grasp His hands and walk in step with Him day-by-day.

BlogSL2-smallest

The Saga of the Four Chaplains

72 years ago today, on February 3rd, 1943, four Army chaplains committed an amazing act of faith, courage and bravery that has never been forgotten.

Although the Distinguished Service Cross and Purple Heart were later awarded posthumously Congress wished to confer the Medal of Honor but was blocked by the stringent requirements which required heroism performed under fire. So a posthumous Special Medal for Heroism, The Four Chaplains’ Medal, was authorized by Congress and awarded by the President on January 18, 1961.

It was never given before and will never be given again. 

This story is definitely worth reading!

On Feb. 3, at 12:55 a.m., a periscope broke the chilly Atlantic waters. Through the cross hairs, an officer aboard the German submarine U-223 spotted the Dorchester.

The U-223 approached the convoy on the surface, and after identifying and targeting the ship, he gave orders to fire the torpedoes, a fan of three were fired. The one that hit was decisive–and deadly–striking the starboard side, amid ship, far below the water line.

Read the entire story here.

Anna-Coffee2The advertising which may appear below is not placed by the author and is not to be considered as a part of this post or an expression of my views.

She’s baaack…finally! [Repost]

a7bd3-im-back

On July 8th, almost a month ago, I posted about needing to take a break from the blogging life. I thought it would be only a week or two, but the “stuff” of my life got totally out of hand and day after day slipped by. However, I’m baaack!!!

Things started out with the horrifyingly sad news about the line-of-duty deaths of the 19 Prescott Granite Mountain Hotshots while fighting the Yarnell fire. There was only one survivor and that was because he was the assigned lookout that day.

On top of that horrible news, the wonderful and crazy part of my month. First, my son, Alan, and two of his firefighter buddies from Dallas came to stay here for a few nights in order to attend and take part in the memorial service for those 19 Granite Mountain Hotshots. Then just as they left,, my daughter, Kathy, arrived for a few days’ visit while she was on vacation.

Wonderful? Absolutely! Crazy? Well, for me it was that, but only because any kind of extra activity—fun or not—greatly impacts my health. I have said many times before that good stress as well as bad stress affects me, and let’s just say that I spent the rest of July recovering.

Would I change any of it? ABSOLUTELY NOT!! I loved having each and every one of them here! Over the next couple of weeks I’ll be sharing some of what happened during my eventful July, a little at a time.

Let me start today with one of the big reasons I haven’t been here in awhile. I’ve been thinking on and praying over things that I saw and heard regarding the deaths of those 19 Hotshots…and aspects of fires (including wildfires) and firefighters in general.

yarnell19-2I have found myself very weepy at times as I contemplate how the families of those 19 fallen firefighters are feeling. They must be reeling from the sudden loss, and that hurts my heart so much. Just this alone made me physically and emotionally weary, which is enough to set off a CFIDS/FMS flare.

My eyes kept “leaking” (the sweet way Rick refers to my crying) as I thought about the significance of the way I prayed for Alan’s salvation for so many years—that God would do whatever He needed to do to get Alan’s attention. And I wept as I prayed this many times over the years because I realized that God could well allow Alan to be severely injured in the line of duty.

One thing we talked about while he was here is that God did indeed use a fire several years ago to get Alan’s complete attention, but thankfully he was not injured in the process. I had never thought about it this way before, and now not one day goes by that I don’t remember that! And praise and thank God for it!

I’d like to leave you today by telling you about a song that was written as a tribute to the 19 fallen Hotshots. Alton Eugene, an Oklahoma man, created “Hope Song” after the devastating tornadoes in Oklahoma. When he heard about these 19 brave Hotshots who were killed while fighting the Yarnell fire, he knew his song could serve as a method to mourn and heal. So he made a tribute to the fallen firefighters as a backdrop to his song.

You can view the video at Alton Eugene’s website. There are also links on the Facebook page he created as a tribute. “Hope Song” (2013 Arizona Fires Tribute), by Alton Eugene, is available on iTunes or Amazon and 100% of every download ($0.99) goes to the families and communities affected by the Yarnell wildfire.

Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends.

—John 15:13

A_Firefighter__s_Prayer…..

AnnaSmile

The advertising which may appear below is not placed by the author
and is not to be considered as a part of this post or an expression of my views.

She’s baaack…finally!

a7bd3-im-back

On July 8th, almost a month ago, I posted about needing to take a break from the blogging life. I thought it would be only a week or two, but the “stuff” of my life got totally out of hand and day after day slipped by. However, I’m baaack!!!

Things started out with the horrifyingly sad news about the line-of-duty deaths of the 19 Prescott Granite Mountain Hotshots while fighting the Yarnell fire. There was only one survivor and that was because he was the assigned lookout that day.

On top of that horrible news, the wonderful and crazy part of my month. First, my son, Alan, and two of his firefighter buddies from Dallas came to stay here for a few nights in order to attend and take part in the memorial service for those 19 Granite Mountain Hotshots. Then just as they left,, my daughter, Kathy, arrived for a few days’ visit while she was on vacation.

Wonderful? Absolutely! Crazy? Well, for me it was that, but only because any kind of extra activity—fun or not—greatly impacts my health. I have said many times before that good stress as well as bad stress affects me, and let’s just say that I spent the rest of July recovering.

Would I change any of it? ABSOLUTELY NOT!! I loved having each and every one of them here! Over the next couple of weeks I’ll be sharing some of what happened during my eventful July, a little at a time.

Let me start today with one of the big reasons I haven’t been here in awhile. I’ve been thinking on and praying over things that I saw and heard regarding the deaths of those 19 Hotshots…and aspects of fires (including wildfires) and firefighters in general.

yarnell19-2I have found myself very weepy at times as I contemplate how the families of those 19 fallen firefighters are feeling. They must be reeling from the sudden loss, and that hurts my heart so much. Just this alone made me physically and emotionally weary, which is enough to set off a CFIDS/FMS flare.

My eyes kept “leaking” (the sweet way Rick refers to my crying) as I thought about the significance of the way I prayed for Alan’s salvation for so many years—that God would do whatever He needed to do to get Alan’s attention. And I wept as I prayed this many times over the years because I realized that God could well allow Alan to be severely injured in the line of duty.

One thing we talked about while he was here is that God did indeed use a fire several years ago to get Alan’s complete attention, but thankfully he was not injured in the process. I had never thought about it this way before, and now not one day goes by that I don’t remember that! And praise and thank God for it!

I’d like to leave you today by telling you about a song that was written as a tribute to the 19 fallen Hotshots. Alton Eugene, an Oklahoma man, created “Hope Song” after the devastating tornadoes in Oklahoma. When he heard about these 19 brave Hotshots who were killed while fighting the Yarnell fire, he knew his song could serve as a method to mourn and heal. So he made a tribute to the fallen firefighters as a backdrop to his song.

You can view the video at Alton Eugene’s website. There are also links on the Facebook page he created as a tribute. “Hope Song” (2013 Arizona Fires Tribute), by Alton Eugene, is available on iTunes or Amazon and 100% of every download ($0.99) goes to the families and communities affected by the Yarnell wildfire.

Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends.

—John 15:13

A_Firefighter__s_Prayer…..

AnnaSmile

The advertising which may appear below is not placed by the author
and is not to be considered as a part of this post or an expression of my views.