The Prophet, The Priest, And The King

The Prophet, The Priest, And The King

From GraceThruFaith

Commentary by Jack Kelley

I think you’ll agree that this is a fascinating account of how God used Daniel the Prophet, Jeduah the High Priest, and Alexander, King of Greece  to prepare the world to receive the Gospel, beginning over 500 years before the fact.

Alexander The Great was born in 356 BC to Philip, King of Macedonia, and Olympias, his wife. As a boy he saw how his Macedonian countrymen, a loose knit group of autonomous tribes, experienced impossible difficulties trying to unite themselves into a strong cohesive force. Because of this the Persians, rulers of the known world, kept them under subjugation. Alexander was particularly incensed when the Persians defeated and humiliated his father, treating his people cruelly.

He determined that their problems were due primarily to an inability to communicate clearly with one another because of the many individual dialects they had developed. This caused misunderstanding and distrust which resulted in a reluctance to fully commit to each other.

With the help of his father Phillip, Alexander crafted a new language, later called common Greek or Koinonia, taught it to the tribal chieftains, and convinced them to use it for inter-tribal communications.  Soon their disagreements were resolved and their mutual trust restored. What had been a rag-tag mob of self-interested tribal factions was on the road to becoming a powerful  army.

Read the rest here.

Sunday Praise and Worship: More and More

SundayPraiseAndWorship-50--AMP

Happy Sunday, Beloved!

I have to confess that these Sunday Praise and Worship posts are my favorite ones to put together. Why? Because I get to spend so much time listening to some wonderful praise and worship songs, which lead me to search Scripture for passages that go well with those songs.

I cannot sing along with lyrics like these without feeling the overflowing love of God, the undeniable mercy and grace of my Savior Jesus. and the fire of the Holy Spirit that guides me through my days.

Now as the people were in expectation,
and all reasoned in their hearts about John,
whether he was the Christ or not,
John answered, saying to all,
“I indeed baptize you with water;
but One mightier than I is coming,
whose sandal strap I am not worthy to loose.
He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire.
His winnowing fan is in His hand,
and He will thoroughly clean out His threshing floor,
and gather the wheat into His barn;
but the chaff He will burn with unquenchable fire.”
—Luke 3:15-16

…..
The words of “More and More” by Selah should echo our hearts’ desire. May we always yearn for more and more of God in our lives.

 

 Please excuse any ads that may appear before the video begins

If for whatever reason you cannot view this video, you can read the complete lyrics here.

Pathway of #Pain

Pathway-of-Pain--AMP

Pathway of Pain

If my days were untroubled and my heart always light,

Would I seek that fair land where there is no night?
If I never grew weary with the weight of my load,
Would I seek for God’s peace at the end of the road?

If I never knew sickness and never felt pain,
Would I search for a hand to help and sustain?
If I walked without sorrow and lived without loss
Would my soul seek solace at the foot of the cross?

If all I desired was mine day by day,
Would I kneel before God and earnestly pray?
If God sent no winter to freeze me with fear,
Would I yearn for the warmth of spring every year?

I ask myself these and the answer is plain,
If my life were pleasure and I never knew pain –
I’d seek God less often and need Him much less,
For God is sought more often in times of distress.

And no one knows God or sees Him as plain –
As those who have met Him on the “Pathway of Pain.”

Author: Helen Steiner Rice

Why Do Bad Things Happen to Good People? Part 2

This is the last part of this series from GraceThruFaith.

 

Why Do Bad Things Happen to Good People? Part 2

This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series Why Do Bad Things Happen

Job’s problem explained.

Last time I said that this is the first and most frequently asked question when people experience serious trouble, whether they’re believers or not. There appear to be at least three answers to this age-old question. The first and by far the most common is found by looking in a mirror. The second has to do with the consequences of sin in the world (we covered these last time) And the third concerns our own sin nature. I’ll share a story to tie the first two together and then use a brief summary of the Book of Job for answer number three.

Tell me a Story

I’ve altered certain facts to disguise this believer’s identity, but his story is true. To most he seems like a friendly guy who takes life pretty much in stride, but behind closed doors he’s way different. Family tales of his temper tantrums are the stuff of legends. Some years ago he suffered a heart attack that required a bypass operation. While recovering in the hospital he learned of a minor accident that had left a small scratch on his car. The next time his family came to visit, he blew up and threw them out. He ignored the doctor’s advice on changing his eating habits to combat his cholesterol problem. I witnessed his temper once in a retail business when he didn’t get the service he wanted. He recently had another heart attack, and the day after getting out of the hospital sent his wife out for a fast food sandwich with fries and a coke. He claims that God sent his heart attacks and refuses to heal him.

Who’s in Charge Here?

This is a great example of our unwillingness to recognize the effect of sin in our world and then accept responsibility for our own behavior.

Read the rest here.

Why Do Bad Things Happen to Good People? Part 1

This is the first part of a two part series from GraceThruFaith

 

Why Do Bad Things Happen to Good People? Part 1

A Bible Study by Jack Kelley

Biblical answers for this age old question.

This has been the topic of several popular books over the years. One author’s conclusion was that either God cares for us but can’t help or else He can help us but doesn’t care. Isn’t that encouraging?

But this is the first and most frequently asked question when people are experiencing serious trouble, whether they’re believers or not. The answers seem to have eluded mankind since the incident between Cain and Able. I say answers because there appear to be at least three. The first and by far the most common is found by looking in a mirror. The second has to do with the consequences of sin in the world. And the third concerns our own sin nature. Let’s take them in order.

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall

First, when I say look in the mirror, I mean that most of us do more in a day to diminish our physical and mental wellbeing than to enhance it. Just look at our eating and exercise habits, the stress we create and endure in the work place, the way we enslave ourselves to materialism, the enormous load of debt and responsibility we carry, and the way we suffer and cause suffering in our relationships.

Read the rest here.

A Splinter Tells All {Repost}

Today’s post is by my friend, Patricia Knight. I’m so thankful that Pat shares these devotionals with me so that I can share them with you when I am not physically up to working much on my blog. Enjoy!

splinter

 A Splinter Tells All

By Patricia Knight

“Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourself with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, and patience.  Bear with each other and forgive whatever grievance you may have against one another and everyone else” (Colossians 3:12-13).

It was only a small splinter in the thumb, but so irritating, like a myriad other things in life that get under one’s skin.  Whenever the thumb brushed against something, the area was painful.  Such is the way of annoyances, disappointments, and consequences in our lives.  We carry them around like prized possessions, allowing their barbs to constantly poke at our weaknesses.

It seems as we progress in life that we would be able to overlook a small infraction or offense toward us because we have far greater issues to confront.   However, our emotions are alive and well, ready to exhibit arrogance and indignity.  Perhaps we cannot dictate our physical aches and pains but we most certainly want to maintain the ability to minimize the emotional and spiritual trauma we experience.

God commands us to love our enemies and to do good to those who hurt us.  He teaches kindness and understanding.  God promotes humility and forgiveness.  We are told to follow His example, mimicking Jesus.

During the years Jesus ministered on earth, He was doubted, ignored, tricked, tempted, and maligned in every possible way.  Not only people’s words, but also the negative motives Jesus could see in their hearts were hurtful to Him.

hands-reaching-out
Let us minimize the suffering we do by reaching out to others in love even when we don’t think they deserve it.  We have never deserved the love God lavishes upon us.  God’s grace gives us what we do not deserve.  God’s mercy does not give us what we do deserve.  Let us extend similar grace and mercy to others.  If we learn to duplicate but a portion of compassion and forgiveness God extends to us, we may be relieved of emotional anxiety and baggage.  At the same time we could improve our personal relationships, learn the value of peace of mind, and obey our God, who commands us to love others as we do ourselves.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to relieve our emotions of all the splintered relationships we have been nurturing?  The loss would be our gain.

BlogSL2-smallest

The #Faith to Walk on Water

Another great Bible study from GraceThruFaith.

 The Faith to Walk on Water

Impossible goals can be brought into perspective through faith.

A Bible Study by Jack Kelley

Most people don’t know that when they use the word stress they really mean distress. Distress is the feeling caused when there’s a need to perform accompanied by a perceived lack of ability.

They also don’t know the other stress word, eustress. It’s the opposite of distress, a combination of euphoria and stress. Eustress is the feeling that comes when there’s a desire to perform accompanied by confidence in one’s ability.

With distress the perception is of impending failure; with eustress it’s of certain success.

Distress causes a depletion of energy, compulsive behavior (which actually increases the probability of failure), a general sense of discouragement, and eventually, depression. To sum up, distress makes me feel like I have to perform, but I’m afraid I can’t.

Symptoms accompanying eustress are a wellspring of energy, propulsive behavior, a sense of well being and confidence, (which improves the probability of success) and an intense desire to succeed. In other words, I want to perform, and believe I can. See the difference? 

Read the rest here.

BlogSL2-smallest